Wednesday, May 20, 2009

Even I Wouldn't Go So Far as This

The 6th grade GATE teacher sent all the parents an email entitled "Mars." The brief message was this:


And another marvelous opportunity...


Kathleen PARENT sent me this PowerPoint presentation about Mars's amazing proximity to Earth in August. Looks like we're in for an amazing month of celestial viewing!


The email had the attachment, which gushed and gushed and gushed.


Another parent then replied to all, saying:


I'm sorry to tell you that this information is not accurate. There are many awesome celestial events that occur many times each year. Check Sky & Telescope Magazine online for postings on what's in the night sky each month. The night sky is always fantastic and we should all focus more attention on it. But this bogus Mars email has been orbiting the internet for several years.


And he includes a link to a specific Sky & Telescope article. I clicked on it just because. One of the last points the author makes in the very brief article is what he tells people asking about the purported event:


The Mars chain letter is not a bad thing, it's a good thing. It's an immunization. If you make a stupid fool of yourself to your family and friends by sending it to them, you may be embarrassed enough not to send them the next e-mail chain letter you get, which may not be so harmless."


Now, you know me. I'm all for telling people to check out things first. Snopes is one of my most-frequented places to hang. But what this know-it-all parent did replying to all to shame the teacher and the parent who sent her the information in the first place? I think he's an ass. And I can't decide whether to send him this email or not:


David, I would say thank you for the information but I'm too appalled at your public humiliation of Ms. TEACHER and Kathleen PARENT. Have you ever learned the power to just say "no" to reply to all?


Too much?

8 comments:

Indy said...

I disagree with you. If Sometimes it takes some pretty strong words to get it through to people to kick the forwarding addiction, all the more power to this "know-it-all" as you call him for telling it like it is. The teacher of all people should've known better than spread a hoax chain letter.

Patois said...

I would have absolutely told the teacher -- but not in a "reply-to-all" format. Whenever I receive an email from someone which contains a hoax, I send them a note, typically pointing them to the Snopes link.

Tara R. said...

The reply to all was unnecessary and the pompous attitude more than annoying. I get dumb forwards from my SIL and MIL all the time. I typically find a link debunking the letter's claim and send it to just them. They still send me junk mail, but I don't have to humiliate them in the process, especially when they are only trying to be helpful.

MamaGeek @ Works For Us said...

Yeah, that sucks. It never ceases to amaze me the lack of etiquette that doesn't exist for e-mail decency.

Anne said...

Maybe he was trying to save the rest of the parents from attempting to see the celestial happenings (I am trying to give him the benefit of the doubt). I rarely forward anything like that without checking it out, but many people are not as familiar with things like Snopes. I agree that telling the teacher would have been fine.

D... said...

What a stinky thing to do. I was around a 4th grader today who I can see growing up to do that very same thing to someone.

musingwoman said...

If it had been me, I'd have emailed privately and given the teacher the opportunity to make the correction.

Coal Miner's Granddaughter said...

Nope. Don't think you're out of line at all. I think, sure, e-mail the teacher, the sender, that it's a hoax or whatever. But the "Reply To All?" He's being a bit of an ass.

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